Charles Hagan - Our Patriot Ancestor

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Charles Hagan - Soldier of the American Revolution
and Great Grandfather of William Francis Rutherford
 
- born April 1761

- private in the 16th Regiment of the Virginia Line - Col William Grayson's Additional Continental Regiment, the 16th Virginia Regiment – served out the remaineder of the war as a substitute in an unnamed regiment.

- regiment commanded by Colonel William Grayson

- company commanded by Captain Thomas Triplett

- served 3 years

- enlisted in Fairfax County Virginia on Feb. 18th 1777 

- fought at the battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth

Battle of Brandywine – Sept 10, 1777

Battle of Germantown – Oct 2, 1777

Battle of Monmouth - June 28, 1778

Winter quarters at Valley Forge - December 19, 1777 to June 19, 1778

Also served - “many skirmishes and scouts” - Grayson’s regiment 

The 3rd Maryland Regiment was organized on 27 March 1776 of eight companies from Anne Arundel, Prince George's, Talbot, Harford and Somerset counties of the colony of Maryland. The 3rd Regiment was raised by Captain Joseph Smith in Maryland on May 31, 1777.

Charles enlisted in the Revolutionary War for three-years on Feb. 18th 1777, and served as a private in Colonel William Grayson’s 16th Virginia Regiment. The 16th Virginia Regiment was originally organized in Maryland and was one of 16 regiments mandated by a congressional resolution in December of 1777. Recruiting efforts eventually focused on Virginian troops, of which Grayson's regiment was largely composed. Charles was assigned to Captain Thomas Triplett’s company. Captains Thomas and William Triplett were Charles Hagan's neighbors, as was George Washington. Charles Hagan was employed by George Washington as a brick mason following the revolution. By April 1779, the regiment was greatly reduced in size due to smallpox and war deaths. Captain Thomas Triplett died from a failed smallpox vaccination following the 16th Virginia’s winter at Valley Forge. Prior to the major engagements of the southern campaign, Grayson's regiment was merged with Colonel Nathaniel Gist’s regiment, where Charles Hagan served under the command of Captain Joseph Smith. Charles Hagan was discharged at Fredericksburg, Virginia on Feb. 10th, 1780 by Lt. James Winchester.
 
Valley Forge 

Charles and brother Francis Hagan were at Valley Forge the infamous winter of Dec 1777 - June 1778

Monthly Muster Roll Status – Charles Hagan – from the war and pay rolls of Col. Grayson’s 16th Regiment of the Virginia Line – Dec 1777-June 1778 - War & Pay Rolls #190 - #207:

December 1777 – #190 - “on scout” - #192 – paid 2£ 10
 
January 1778 – #193 - paid 2£ 10 - #195 – “on picket”
 
February 1778 – #196 – paid 2£ 10- #197 – “sick present”
 
March 1778 – #197 – no comments #200 - 2£ 10
 
April 1778 – #202 – no comments
 
May 1778 – #204 - paid 2£ 10 - #205 - paid 2£ 10
 
June 1778 - #206 - paid 2£ 10 - #207 – no comments
 
- Charles Hagan was discharged in Fredericksburg, Virginia on Feb. 10th, 1780 by Lt. James Winchester

- pension claim number is S.36008

- moved to Kentucky following the war and later to Charleston, Indiana

- later moved to Jackson County Indiana - Driftwood Township

- occupation: brick mason/maker

- He died on Jan.30 1839 - buried in Driftwood Twsp Jackson County, IN [White Church Cemetery - unmarked grave]

- His wife's name was Susannah [not Savannah] - born abt 1779

Fairfax Co., Virginia 

Charles' family moved to Fairfax Co., Virginia where they worked as bricklayers. His father John Hagan and he made and laid thousands of bricks in the construction of George Washington’s home at Mount Vernon and appear in General Washington's diary and cash accounts:

Charles Hagan signed a contract with George Washington on 5 Jan. 1788, agreeing to begin work at Mount Vernon "as early in the spring as the state of the ground will admit" (DLC:GW). His pay was set at a rate of £4 10s a month, allowing 26 working days or nights to the month. In addition, he was to be given provisions and a half a pint of rum a day. Hagan apparently was a diligent laborer, for between this date and 12 Nov. 1788, when he stopped working for George Washington, he accumulated a total of 7 months and 14 days in working time, earning £33 18s. 

(LEDGER B, 271). - The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources, 1745-1799. John C. Fitzpatrick, Editor

......... 

Diary entry: April 17th, 1788 - George Washington’s Diary

Charles Hagan came to Brick making to day—set him to makg. a cover for the Bricks before he began to Mould. Gunner and Sam were sent to Work with him.
[The slaves Gunner and Sam were laborers on the Home House plantation.]

The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2008.
Original source: Diaries (11 March 1748–13 December 1799), Volume 5 (1 July 1786–31 December 1789)

......... 

Diary entry: April 28th, 1788 - George Washington’s Diary

Charles Hagan, the Brickmaker, not at Work to day.
No work could be done in the breach of the Mill race to day, on Acct. of the wetness of the Earth.

The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2008.
Original source: Diaries (11 March 1748–13 December 1799), Volume 5 (1 July 1786–31 December 1789)

......... 

Diary entry: April 28th, 1788 - George Washington’s Diary

Charles Hagan was at work in the Brickyard.

The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2008.
Original source: Diaries (11 March 1748–13 December 1799), Volume 5 (1 July 1786–31 December 1789)

......... 

Diary entry: May 26th, 1788 - George Washington’s Diary

Added Thos. Davis, Reuben, and Billy to the Brick layers to day, by which means five were thus employed. The necessary attendance was given them. Also set Gunner to making Bricks, along with Charles Hagan, with attendance also.

The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2008.
Original source: Diaries (11 March 1748–13 December 1799), Volume 5 (1 July 1786–31 December 1789)

......... 

Diary entry: 25 June 1788 - George Washington’s Diary

Set fire to another Brick kiln to day—qty. said to be 35,000.

The Papers of George Washington Digital Edition, ed. Theodore J. Crackel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, Rotunda, 2008.
Original source: Diaries (11 March 1748–13 December 1799), Volume 5 (1 July 1786–31 December 1789)

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George Washington’s diary - citations that mention the brick work during the contract period of Charles Hagan [January 5, 1788 to November 12, 1788]

Diary entry: 22 May 1788 - Began to lay the foundation of my Barn, for the Ferry and French’s Plantations, of Brick. Although GW built his new barn of brick, he did not do it on the recommendation of Arthur Young. “I have seen,” Young wrote in 1791, “very expensive barns in Ireland, which the owners have boasted would confine a mouse;—so much the worse: there cannot be too much air all around: the sides, for this reason, should be neither of brick nor stone. . . . The best barns (for corn) are of boards; and the more air those boards admit, the better will the straw be for the cattle; and the brighter the sample of corn in a ticklish season” (ANNALS, 16:150–51).

Diary entry: 23 May 1788 - Visited the Plantations at the Ferry, French’s, and Neck and the Brick yard.

Diary entry: 28 May 1788 - Rid to the Ferry, Frenchs & Dogue run Plantations, and to the Brick yard.

Diary entry: 30 May 1788 - Having worked up the Bricks of the first Kiln—the Brick layers went to get & lay in a stock of Sand—but the second load of Corn from York River arriving the Boat would be occupied in landing of it to morrow.

Diary entry: 24 June 1788 - Began, yesterday, to set another Brick Kiln.

Diary entry: 25 June 1788 - Set fire to another Brick kiln to day—qty. said to be 35,000.

Diary entry: 30 June 1788 - Rid to the Ferry, French’s and Dogue run Plantations; and to the Brick yard.

Diary entry: 11 July 1788 - Began to set another Brick kiln to day.

Diary entry: 8 September 1788 - The Waggon, and Carts from D. Run, Ferry and Frenchs, were Carting Brick Wood.

Diary entry: 9 September 1788 - The Waggon & Carts that were drawing Brick Wood yesterday, were at it again to day. About 12 O’clock to day the Brick layers compleated the 12th. course of Bricks, of the 14 Inch Wall from the second floor in the New Barn.

Diary entry: 10 September 1788 - At the Ferry—all were at the Mansion House. The Carts of the last 3 places were engaged at the Brickyard.

Diary entry: 8 October 1788 - At Dogue run—The people were opening & spreading the fodder. 7 Plows were at work and the Cart as that of Muddy hole, Frenchs and the Ferry also were, were carting brick wood at the New Barn.

To the District of Columbia Commissioners, 27 October 1798

All the Joists, Rafters, Ceiling Joists, Stooths, Quarter Partitions, &c. to be laid not more than 13 Inches apart. All the fire places to have framed Timbers in the floors for Brick Arches. The two Passage Walls to have 4 Bond Timbers, in each, one under every floor, with Cross Ties to the same. The Roof to have 2 Purlins on each Side, and to be framed with Rafters, Ceiling Joists, and Stooth as Pr Section.

The Roof to have 6 Dormer Windows on the Brick side, with Pitched Roofs, and Sliding sashes each window to contain 9 panes of Glass, 8 by 10 Inches. The front side of the Roof to have 2 sky lights to slide, each sky light to Contain 9 panes of Glass 8 by 10 Inches, all well bedded in putty.

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July 18, 1791, page 256 
The road from Cameron run to Douges run, The Tiths. which now are &c. - of Will. Dorrell, Capn. Harper, Walter Brooks, Mary Darrell, Wm. Keating, Edwd. Lewis, Mrs. French, Francis & Charles Hagan, John Compton, Jerry Adams' place & Colo. Masons upper quarter - William Darrell, Overseer. 

FAIRFAX COUNTY ROAD ORDERS 1749-1800 
Beth Mitchell
Charlottesville, Virginia - June 2003

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Charles Hagan's Children Named:

Charles Hagan - Jackson County SAR Indiana Roster, Vol. 1, p. 169
 
His will was dated 12 Apr 1837 and was probated on 18 May 1839
 
pp. 130/1, Probate Court Minute Book C., Washington Co., Indiana
 
Pension Application in Minute Book E, pp 230 and 266, Washington County, Indiana: 
 
Children mentioned in Charles Hagan's will:
 
John C. Hagan 

Henry Hagan (youngest) 

William Hagan, d. before father 

Francis Hagan, d. before father 

Leroy Hagan 

Charles Hagan Jr.

Edward T. Hagan 

George Hagan 

Mary Hagan, m. Benjamin Pidgeon  

Juliet Hagan, m. Henry Lyster 

Executor: John Lee

Witnesses: Alfred Stanfield and Benjamin Pidgeon

By Miss Lulie Davis, 306 S. High St., Salem, Indiana 47167.